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from SACOBU My father was also a teacher. He taught undergraduate entertained us with in his quieter moments. He used to say to and post-graduate medical students at the University of Sydney us the main books to have in the home are the Bible and a and the University of NSW. His students thought he was a fine Complete Works of William Shakespeare. teacher, one of the best. He had the largest medical practice Edited from the eulogy delivered by Dr Hall’s son Anthony Hall in Macquarie Street of any doctor during his career, because (SAC 1972) at his Requiem Mass at St Mary’s Church, North people loved him and felt very secure in his care. Sydney, on 25 September 2009. He was one of the first doctors to discover cardiomyopathy after researching a series of his patients in the 1950s and 1934 1960s. His discovery led to heart transplant surgery in Felix Favaloro died on 2 May 2011. hospitals all over the world. He proudly boasted that St Vincent’s Hospital has the most successful heart transplant 1940 surgery in the world. My father and Harry Windsor trained Victor Chang to become the world renowned heart transplant Tom Makinson died on 5 October 2011. Tom’s grandsons, surgeon. It was Dad’s and Harry Windsor’s work that led to Chris (SAC 2000) and Justin (SAC 2004) are Old Boys of the heart transplants in Australia. College. Dad was very humble. He never spoke of his achievements James Ernest Macken BEc, MBBS, FRACGP, DObstRCOG and was reluctant to receive honours which he truly deserved. (SAC 1940) died on 19 January 2010. Jim Macken was I remember once showing him that he had his name recorded born in Sydney on 24 January 1924, the eldest child of in Who’s Who in the World and he typically brushed it aside Irish immigrants. He grew up in Greenwich, Sydney, and as of no significance. was educated at St Aloysius’ College, Milson’s Point. In his final year there he was a prefect and a member of the Dad had a strong faith in the Lord and he often stressed to First XV (rugby) and First XI (cricket). After school, he joined us, his children, that faith in the Lord was the most important the Commonwealth Bank, while successfully studying for his goal to aspire to and treasure. He went to Mass often. economics degree part-time. As a doctor, he dedicated his skills to the Catholic clergy, He switched careers in 1953, commencing his medical cardinals of Sydney, nuns, brothers and priests. His love of the studies at the University of Sydney at the age of 29. At Church was expressed through his medical care of so many university, he was often referred to as ‘Senator’ Macken, as of the clergy. he was a mature-aged undergraduate representative on the Dad loved sport. He played first grade in cricket and rugby university senate. at St Aloysius’ College as a boy and loved talking about the Jim was a medical student at Royal North Shore Hospital. days he saw Sir Donald Bradman and Stan McCabe play at After graduating in 1959, he undertook his residency at the the SCG. Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Sydney, before entering general In fact, he often would tell the story of Bradman telling his practice at North Bondi. This was a dedicated community players to come out and watch Stan McCabe bat. Bradman practice, with the doctors doing house calls, nursing home said: “You will never see its likes again.” visits and obstetrics. Jim remained there for almost forty years. Dad was a very keen South Sydney supporter in the rugby As a visiting GP Obstetrician at St Margaret’s Hospital, league and often told us stories of how he and his father would Darlinghurst, Jim delivered many babies over the years, and go out to see Souths win many premierships. We, like Dad, gained his Diploma of Obstetrics from the Royal College of followed Souths and were able to be with him at the SCG Obstetricians and Gynaecologists in 1980. He became a to see Souths win several premierships in the 1960s and Fellow of the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners 70s. Dad loved horse racing and went out to the track every in 1981 and was an examiner at the College exams for a Saturday afternoon for his relaxation. He made many friends in number of years. the racing fraternity and many were his patients. His wide-ranging interest in history, politics, sport, cards When Dad retired he was made an Officer of the Order of and literature enabled him to discuss virtually any subject Australia, for his extraordinary work in cardiology in Australia with his patients, whether young or old. Jim was always and overseas. Twenty years before this he was made a Papal immaculately groomed and had a great sense of humour and Knight of the Order of St Gregory the Great by Pope Paul charming bedside manner. He was a lifetime member of the VI on his visit to Australia in 1970 for his long service to the Balmoral Beach Club and swam in the inaugural Jack Cox Catholic Church. Memorial 1500 m swim in 1946. He enjoyed playing golf at the Royal Sydney Golf Club. He was also made an honorary Marist Brother out of gratitude to Dad for looking after the Brothers. For fifty years, Jim was married to Marie, who died from ovarian cancer four months before Jim died from cardiac After Mum died, Dad married Ellen Bowyer, Mum’s first and renal failure on 19 January 2010. Jim is survived by his cousin. Ellen looked after Dad very well and loved him dearly. children Philip, Peter, John, Marea, James and Rosie. My father had many sayings, such as “It is a great life if you don’t weaken” and he also said,: “Do not take life too Peter Macken and V. John Roche seriously, you will never get out of it alive.” 1943 He had a great love of Shakespeare’s plays and extraordinary memory for quotes from Shakespeare, which he Bruce Jenkins died on 7 October 2011. Bruce was Father of St Aloysius’ College A Jesuit School for Boys _ Founded 1879 a l oy s i a d / page 74


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